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EST 361 History of the American Environmental Movement : Class Schedule Detail

 

Schedule detail

PART I: EARLY AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENTS

Week 1 – Introduction

Tues., 8/27: Course introduction

What is a social movement?

Life-cycles of social movements

Issue-attention life cycle

Why an historical perspective?

Aims of this course

Assumptions

Syllabus review

        recommended

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.1

Thurs., 8/29: Before environmentalism

Native Americans and traditional human ecology in North America

Settlers in the New World

Discussion

        Required:

Nash, Wilderness, prologue, ch's 1, 2

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 2-4

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.2, "The study of social movements"

        ADDITIONAL:

Cronon, William. 1983. Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England. NY: Hill and Wang.

Guha, Ramachandra. 2000. Environmentalism: A Global History. New York: Addison Wesley Longman.

Kline, Benjamin. 2010. First Along the River: A Brief History of the US Environmental Movement, 4th ed. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Spence, Mark D. 1999. Dispossessing the Wilderness: Indian Removal and the Making of the National Parks. NY: Oxford Univ. Press

Week 2 – Preservationism

Tues., 9/3: Romantic wilderness

Romantic wilderness

American wilderness

Henry David Thoreau

Discussion/ debate groups (formation)

      Required:

Nash, Wilderness, ch's 3-5

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch.6

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.4, "What is a cultural movement?"

        ADDITIONAL:

Thoreau, Henry D. 1854. Walden. Available: http://thoreau.eserver.org/walden00.html

*** Weekly Reading Note #1 due (Wilderness, through ch.2) ***

Thurs., 9/5: American preservationism

Film: PBS, "The Wilderness Idea: John Muir, Gifford Pinchot and the First Great Battle for Wilderness" (2008), 58 mins.

Discussion

        Required:

Nash, Wilderness, ch's 6, 7

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 8, 9, 11

        ADDITIONAL:

Muir, John. 1901. Our National Parks. Available: http://www.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/writings/our_national_parks/

Week 3 – Conservationism

Tues., 9/10: Establishment of national (and state) parks

            Lecture

Discussion/ debate groups

        Required:

Nash, Wilderness, ch.10

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 10-11

        ADDITIONAL:

Pinchot, Gifford. 1905. "Work in the Woods". Ch. 2 in A Primer of Forestry. Part II: Practical Forestry. US Forest Service, Washington, DC. Available: http://tinyurl.com/3n4wv6j.

*** Weekly Reading Note #2 due (Wilderness, ch's 3-7) ***

Thurs., 9/12: Toward a philosophy of wilderness

Film: PBS, "Wild by Law: The Rise of Environmentalism and the Creation of the Wilderness Act" (2008), 58 mins.

            Discussion

        Required:

Nash, Wilderness, ch's 11-13

        RECOMMENDED:

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.3, "What is a political movement?"

        ADDITIONAL:

Marshall, Bob. 1930. "The Problem of the Wilderness," Scientific Monthly 30(2): 141‑148. Available: http://tinyurl.com/3o3le9c.

Week 4 – American Preservationism as a Social Movement

 Tues., 9/17: What Do Social Movements Do?

Lecture

Debate preparation

        Required:

Nash, Wilderness, ch's 14-16, epilogue

        RECOMMENDED:

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.5, "What do social movements do?"

        ADDITIONAL:

Gottlieb, Robert. 1993. "Reconstructing Environmentalism: Complex Movements, Diverse Roots," Environmental History Review 17(4): 1-19. Available: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3984644.

Marshall, Bob. 2005 [1956]. Alaska Wilderness: Exploring the Central Brooks Range, 3rd ed. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Pinchot, Gifford. 1905. "Forestry Abroad and at Home". Ch. 4 in A Primer of Forestry. Part II: Practical Forestry. US Forest Service, Washington, DC. Available: http://tinyurl.com/3nmyp84.

Simonian, Lane. 1995. Defending the Land of the Jaguar: A History of Conservation in Mexico. Austin: University of Texas Press.

*** Weekly Reading Note #3 due (Wilderness, ch's 8-13) ***

*** Essay #1 – Early Environmental Movements (due Tues., 9/24) ***

Thurs., 9/19: Debate #1

Debate #1:  "For the Greatest Good?"

PART II: THE SECOND WAVE OF AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM

Week 5 – Urbanization and the environment

Tues., 9/24: Earth Days (Part I)

Film: PBS, "Earth Days: The Seeds of a Revolution" (2010), 100 mins. – Part I

            Discussion

Thurs., 9/26: “One, many American environmental movements”

Urban and industrial roots of American environmentalism

            Discussion

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, intro, ch's 1, 2 (pp. xiii-120)

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 5, 12

        ADDITIONAL:

Tarr, Joel A. 1996. The Search for the Ultimate Sink: Urban Pollution in Historical Perspective. Akron, OH: University of Akron Press.

Taylor, Dorceta E. 2009. The Environment and People in American Cities, 1600s-1900s: Disorder, Inequality, and Social Change. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Week 6 – Professionalization of environmentalism

Tues., 10/1: 1960s environmentalism (Earth Days, Part II)

Film: PBS, "Earth Days: The Seeds of a Revolution" (2010), 100 mins.  – Part II

            Discussion

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, ch.3

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 13-15

        ADDITIONAL:

Brulle, Robert J. 2000. Agency, Democracy, and Nature: The US Environmental Movement from a Critical Theory Perspective. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Dunlap, Riley E., and Angela G. Mertig. 1991. "The Evolution of the US Environmental Movement from 1970 to 1990: An Overview," Society & Natural Resources 4(3): 209-218.

Dunlap, Riley E. 1992. "Trends in Public Opinion Toward Environmental Issues: 1965-1990". Ch. 8 in American Environmentalism: The US Environmental Movement, 1970-1990, eds. Riley E. Dunlap and Angela G. Mertig. Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis.

*** Weekly Reading Note #4 due (Forcing the Spring, ch’s 1-2) ***

Thurs., 10/3: Mainstreaming environmentalism

Discussion/ debate groups

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, ch.4

        ADDITIONAL:

Mitchell, Robert Cameron, Angela G. Mertig, and Riley E. Dunlap. 1991. "Twenty Years of Environmental Mobilization: Trends Among National environmental Organizations," Society & Natural Resources 4(3): 219-234.

McCloskey, Michael. 1992. "Twenty Years of Change in the Environmental Movement: An Insider's View". Ch. 7 in American Environmentalism: The US Environmental Movement, 1970-1990, eds. Riley E. Dunlap and Angela G. Mertig. Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis.

Week 7 – Grassroots Response

Tues., 10/8: Alternative environmental movements

            From the grassroots

Research paper assignment

Discussion/ debate groups

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, ch.5 (Grassroots & Direct Action)

        RECOMMENDED:

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.6, "Researching social movements"

Lester & Lester, Writing Research Papers, ch.2, "Finding a Topic"

*** Weekly Reading Note #5 due (Forcing the Spring, ch’s 3-4) ***

Thurs., 10/10: Gender and environmental issues

Film: PBS, “Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring” (1993), 55 mins.

Discussion

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, ch.6 (Gender)

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 12, 13, 15

        ADDITIONAL:

Epstein, Barbara. 1993. "Ecofeminism and Grass-roots Environmentalism in the United States". Ch. 14 in Toxic Struggles: The Theory and Practice of Environmental Justice, ed. Richard Hofrichter. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers.

Krauss, Celene. 1993. "Blue Collar Women and Toxic-Waste Protests: The Process of Politicization". Ch. 10 in Toxic Struggles: The Theory and Practice of Environmental Justice, ed. Richard Hofrichter. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers.

Merchant, Carolyn. 2005. "Ecofeminism". Ch. 8 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

Mies, Marie, and Vandana Shiva. 1993. Ecofeminism. Highlands, NJ: Zed Books.

Week 8 – Diversity in American Environmentalism

Tues., 10/15: Ethnicity, class and environmental issues

Lecture

Discussion

Debate preparation

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring, ch's 7 (Ethnicity), 8 (Class)

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch's 4, 7, 15

        ADDITIONAL:

Bullard, Robert. 1992. "The Quest for Environmental Equity: Mobilizing the African-American Community for Social Change". Ch. 4 in American Environmentalism: The US Environmental Movement, 1970-1990, eds. Riley E. Dunlap and Angela G. Mertig. Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis.

Merchant, Carolyn. 2005. "Environmental Ethics and Political Conflict". Ch. 3 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

Roberts, J. Timmons, and Mellisa M. Toffolon-Weiss. 2001. Chronicles from the Environmental Justice Frontlines. New York: Cambridge University Press

Berman, Daniel M. 1978. Death on the Job: Occupational Health and Safety Struggles in the United States. New York: Monthly Review Press.

Hofrichter, Richard, ed. 1993. Toxic Struggles: The Theory and Practice of Environmental Justice. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers.

Kazis, Richard, and Richard L. Grossman. 1982. Fear at Work: Job Blackmail, Labor and the Environment. New York: Pilgrim Press.

Smith, Ted, David A. Sonnenfeld, and David N. Pellow, eds., 2006. Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

*** Weekly Reading Note #6 due (Forcing the Spring, ch's 5-6) ***

*** Essay #2 – American Environmentalism: The Second Wave (due Tues., Oct. 22) ***

Thurs., 10/17: Debate #2

Debate #2:  "Mainstream vs. Grassroots Environmentalism"

        Required:

Gottlieb, Forcing the Spring (all)

PART III: THE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE MOVEMENT

Week 9 – Toxic Wastes and Race

Tues., 10/22: Chester, Pennsylvania fights back  

Film: Robert Bahar & George McCollough, Laid to Waste (1997), 52 mins.

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, preface, intro, ch.1 (pp. 1-33)       

        ADDITIONAL:

Commission for Racial Justice. 1987. "Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States". New York: United Church of Christ.

Bullard, Robert D. 2000. Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality, 3rd ed. Boulder: Westview.

 

Thurs., 10/24: Political economy of environmental racism

Lecture

            Discussion

The political economy of environmental racism

Discussion/ debate prep

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, ch's 2-3

        ADDITIONAL:

Bullard, Robert D., ed. 1993. Confronting Environmental Racism: Voices from the Grassroots. Boston: South End Press.

Pellow, David N. 2000. "Environmental Inequality Formation: Toward a Theory of Environmental Injustice," American Behavioral Scientist 43(4): 581-601.

Taylor, Dorceta E. 2000. "The Rise of the Environmental Justice Paradigm: Injustice Framing and the Social Construction of Environmental Discourses," American Behavioral Scientist 43(4): 508-580.

*** Research Paper Assignment #T-1 (due Thurs., 10/31) ***

Week 10 – Varieties of Environmental Justice Advocacy

Tues., 10/29: Circle of poison: from fields to plate

Videos: "Cesar Chavez: Pesticides Kill Farm Workers" (1990), 11 mins.; Earth Justice, "Kids at Risk" (2009), 4 mins.; Food, Inc., "Martin Sheen Stands Up for Farm Workers" (2009), 1 min.

Pesticides, food safety, and farmworker health

Discussion/ debate prep

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, ch.4

        ADDITIONAL:

Chavez, Cesar. 1983. "Farm Workers at Risk". Ch. 16 in Toxic Struggles: The Theory and Practice of Environmental Justice, ed. Richard Hofrichter. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers.

Pulido, Laura. 1996. Environmentalism and Economic Justice: Two Chicano Struggles in the Southwest. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Wright, Angus. 1986. "Rethinking the Circle of Poison: The Politics of Pesticide Farming among Mexican Farm Workers," Latin American Perspectives 13(4):26-59.

Wright, Angus. 2005. The Death of Ramon Gonzalez: The Modern Agricultural Dilemma, rev. ed. Austin: University of Texas Press.

*** Weekly Reading Note #7 due (From the Ground Up, through ch.3) ***

Thurs., 10/31: The structure of environmental decision making

Film: Lynn Corcoran, "In Our Own Backyard: The First Love Canal" (1982), 59 mins.

            Discussion

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, ch.5

        recommended:            

Lester & Lester, Writing Research Papers, ch's 3, 5, 8, 9, Appendix

        ADDITIONAL:

Richardson, Mary, Joan Sherman, and Michael Gismondi. 1993. Winning Back the Words: Confronting Experts in an Environmental Public Hearing. Toronto: Garamond Press.

Week 11 – Transformative Politics

Tues., 11/5: Transformative politics

Discussion

Debate prep

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, ch.6

        RECOMMENDED:

Merchant, Problems, ch’s 8, 11, 14, 15

        ADDITIONAL:

Bullard, Robert D., ed. 2005. The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books.

LaDuke, Winona. 1983. "A Society Based on Conquest Cannot Be Sustained: Native Peoples and the Environmental Crisis". Ch. 9 in Toxic Struggles: The Theory and Practice of Environmental Justice, ed. Richard Hofrichter. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers.

Pellow, David N., and Robert J. Brulle, eds. 2006. Power, Justice, and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

*** Weekly Reading Note #8 due (From the Ground Up, ch's 4-5) ***

*** Essay #3 – The Environmental Justice Movement (due Tues., 11/12) ***

Thurs., 11/7: Debate #3

Debate #3: "Is Environmental Inequality Intentional?

        Required:

Cole & Foster, From the Ground Up, ch.7

        ADDITIONAL:

Eyerman, Ron, and Andrew Jamison. 1991. Social Movements: A Cognitive Approach. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.

*** Research Paper Assignment #T-2 (due Thurs., 11/14) ***

PART IV: FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT

Week 12 – Globalization and the Environment

Tues., 11/12: This Changes Everything?

Film: Naomi Klein, "This Changes Everything" (2015), 90 mins.

        Required:

Speth, Bridge at the End of the World, preface, introduction, ch's 1-2

        RECOMMENDED:

Klein, This Changes Everything

Merchant, Problems, ch.15

        ADDITIONAL:

Merchant, Carolyn. 2005. "The Global Ecological Crisis". Ch. 1 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

__________. 2005. "Science and Worldviews". Ch. 2 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

O'Brien, Robert, et al. 2000. Contesting Global Governance: Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Thurs., 11/14: System Failure?

Modern capitalism: out of control?

Discussion/ debate groups

        Required:

Speth, Bridge at the End of the World, ch.3

        ADDITIONAL:

Dowie, Mark. 1995. Losing Ground: American Environmentalism at the Close of the Twentieth Century. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Roberts, J. Timmons, and Bradley C. Parks. 2007. A Climate of Injustice: Global Inequality, North-South Politics, and Climate Policy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Week 13 – The Great Transformation

Tues., 11/19: Market-based environmental transformations

Lecture

            Discussion

        Required:

Speth, Bridge at the End of the World, ch's 4-6

        RECOMMENDED:

Lester & Lester, Writing Research Papers, ch's 7, 10, 12, 13, 15

        ADDITIONAL:

Jones, Van. 2008. The Green Collar Economy. New York: HarperCollins

Micheletti, Michele. 2003. Political Virtue and Shopping: Individuals, Consumerism and Collective Action. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

*** Weekly Reading Note #9 due (Bridge, through ch.3) ***

Thurs., 11/21: Beyond today's capitalism?

Lecture

Discussion/ debate groups

        Required:

Speth, Bridge at the End of the World, ch's 7-9

        ADDITIONAL:

Mol, Arthur P.J., David A. Sonnenfeld, and Gert Spaargaren, eds. 2009. The Ecological Modernisation Reader: Environmental Reform in Theory and Practice. London and New York: Routledge

THANKSGIVING BREAK                                          

Week 14 – New Environmentalism?

Tues., 12/3: New consciousness, new politics

Lecture

            Discussion

            Debate preparation

        Required:

Speth, Bridge at the End of the World (all)

        RECOMMENDED:

Litfin, Ecovillages

Johnston, What Is a Social Movement? ch.7, "Where are social movements headed?"

        ADDITIONAL:

Merchant, Carolyn. 2005. "Environmental Ethics and Political Conflict". Ch. 3 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

__________. 2005. "Anti-Globalization and Sustainability". Ch. 9 in Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge.

Schor, Juliet B., and Betsy Taylor, eds. 2002. Sustainable Planet: Solutions for the Twenty-first Century. Boston: Beacon Press.

Shabecoff, Philip. 2000. Earth Rising: American Environmentalism in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: Island Press 

Tarrow, Sidney. 2005. The New Transnational Activism. New York: Cambridge Univ. Press

*** Weekly Reading Note #10 due (Bridge, ch's 4-9) ***

Thurs., 12/5: Debate #4

Debate #4: "Future of the American Environmental Movement"

Final Exam Week

*** Research Paper Assignment #T-3 due ***

 

Notices

Accommodations

SUNY-ESF works closely with the Office of Disability Services (ODS) at Syracuse University in assisting students with learning and physical disabilities. If you may need accommodations in this course related to a disability, please contact the ESF Office of Student Affairs, 110 Bray Hall, tel. 315.470.6660, for assistance with the process. You may also contact ODS directly, 804 University Avenue, rm. 309; call 315.443.4498, to schedule an appointment. ODS is responsible for coordinating disability-related accommodations and issues Accommodation Authorization Letters to students with documented disabilities, as appropriate. Since accommodations may require early planning and generally are not provided retroactively, please contact ODS as soon as possible. To learn more about ODS, visit http://disabilityservices.syr.edu.

Academic integrity

Plagiarism is presenting others' work as your own without acknowledgment of its source(s). Plagiarism includes verbatim and close paraphrasing of material from course texts and other published materials, cutting and pasting from electronic sources, and unattributed paraphrasing. Acts of academic dishonesty are defined in the ESF Academic Integrity Handbook and violate the College's Code of Student Conduct. Students are accountable for such acts. If you have any questions about how to properly quote or reference others' work, please consult writing reference texts, your instructor, or other campus resources. 

Personal electronics

This course is intended to be an educational experience for all. To ensure that the classroom environment is conducive for learning, please follow these guidelines in use of personal electronics: Cell phones should be off while class is in session. If you need to maintain your phone on silent mode due to a personal emergency, please notify the instructor in advance. Digital devices may be used for reading, note-taking, and course-related research activities. Text messaging, social media viewing, updating, etc., during class is disruptive and not permitted. Use of ear buds or earphones during class is unconducive to participation and is not permitted. Disruptive behavior is a violation of ESF's Code of Student Conduct. Students who are disruptive may be asked to leave the classroom; persistent disruptions will have further consequences. Thank you for helping us all get the most out of class.

Fire alarms

If a fire alarm sounds, exit the building immediately, to the area designated for this course. Stay together as a class until released. Take all personal belongings with you, including keys, backpacks, electronics, and coats. Let your instructor know in advance if you have any special needs in case of a building evacuation. For further information, contact the Office of Student Affairs, tel. 315.470.6660.